New York-based BrightFarms, which builds rooftop greenhouses, hopes to turn a profit while cutting shoppers’ “food miles” down to zero by growing vegetables where people buy them: the supermarket. BrightFarms is trying to convince major supermarket chains to hire them to cover vacant roofs with heirloom tomatoes, salad greens, and other produce. The company’s business plan is simple: they handle the labor and expense of farming—greenhouse design, construction, planting, and harvest—while participating supermarkets sign a 10-year contract agreeing to purchase whatever is grown on their rooftop. A store’s rooftop garden can produce as much as 500,000 pounds of produce a year, BrightFarms told Edible Manhattan. “We grow for taste, not for shelf-life, and we pick when the vegetables are ripe,” CEO Paul Lightfoot explains in a video on BrightFarm’s website. (via New Company Brings Produce From the Roof to the Supermarket Aisle - Health - GOOD)

New York-based BrightFarms, which builds rooftop greenhouses, hopes to turn a profit while cutting shoppers’ “food miles” down to zero by growing vegetables where people buy them: the supermarket. BrightFarms is trying to convince major supermarket chains to hire them to cover vacant roofs with heirloom tomatoes, salad greens, and other produce. The company’s business plan is simple: they handle the labor and expense of farming—greenhouse design, construction, planting, and harvest—while participating supermarkets sign a 10-year contract agreeing to purchase whatever is grown on their rooftop. A store’s rooftop garden can produce as much as 500,000 pounds of produce a year, BrightFarms told Edible Manhattan. “We grow for taste, not for shelf-life, and we pick when the vegetables are ripe,” CEO Paul Lightfoot explains in a video on BrightFarm’s website. (via New Company Brings Produce From the Roof to the Supermarket Aisle - Health - GOOD)

  • Source: GOOD

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